Sean Doolittle: ‘You’re an a—hole’ if you bash Daniel Hudson for choosing kid’s birth over NLCS game

ST. LOUIS — Daniel Hudson wasn’t at Busch Stadium for Game 1 of the NLCS.

Instead, the right-hander was with his family, in Phoenix, watching the birth of his third daughter. Staying by his his wife’s side was, obviously, a no-brainer choice. Who chooses a sporting event over the birth of a child, right? 

Apparently, some people do, people like former Marlins front-office person David Samson. 

It’s fair to say, though, that Samson’s opinion was not shared in the Nationals’ clubhouse. Sean Doolittle, who shares closing duties with Hudson and locked down the Game 1 save, made that crystal clear after the Nationals won Game 2 on Saturday night. 

Doolittle: “If your reaction to someone having a baby is anything other than, ‘Congratulations, I hope everybody’s healthy,’ you’re an a—hole.”

Yep. 

Doolittle’s quote spread quickly on social media, of course. He struck a chord, the way Doolittle often does with things of this nature. And he wasn’t alone. 

“I never missed any of my kids’ births. I think that’s important,” manager Dave Martinez said before the game. “I told them that. Because, hey, believe it or not, he was, he wanted to be with the team, and I told him I think that it’s important that you’re with your wife. It’s a big moment in your family. I know you have other kids, but it’s huge. You’ve got to be supportive and we get it.”

Hudson’s wife was scheduled to be induced Thursday morning, but a lack of beds — a common practice, because natural births take priority over inductions — forced a delay, and Hudson stayed with his family. 

And it was fitting that Hudson recorded the save Saturday night, retiring the only two batters he faced to close out the win. 

“It’s been great,” Hudson said after the game. “As soon as I walked in, everybody was excited to see me. Hugs all around, high-fives all around. Guys were asking me how everybody’s doing. It’s been great. Top to bottom, couldn’t ask for better guys to be around.”

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